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  • Refrigerator Repair in MD

  • Refrigerator Repair in MD

      Water feels cold on your skin because it takes away heat (540 cal/gram) as it evaporates. Water vapor from your breath fogs and warms a cold glass as liquid water beads condense on the cold surface. Refrigerators and air conditioning units repeat these phase transitions, evaporation of liquid to gas and condensation of gas to liquid, in a continuous cycle to carry heat from an evaporator inside a compartment to be released at a condensor outside.

    Refrigerator Repair in MD

    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    Air conditioners and refrigerators work by evaporating refrigerant liquids in a sealed heat exchanger (evaporator – some look like a car radiator) to cool air. Refrigerant liquids, like Freon (and the new R-134) are chloroflorocarbons (CFCs) with very low boiling points (-30°C) that remove large amounts of heat as they quickly evaporate.

    Refrigerator Repair in MD

    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    The refrigerant vapors can then be pressurized with a refrigeration compressor and sent to another sealed heat exchanger (condensor) to cool and condense the hot gases back to liquid form. The high pressure liquid refrigerant is ready to squirt into the evaporator for additional cooling on demand.
    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    Automotive Air-conditioning System
    The following description of refrigerator repair is applicable to home and automobile air conditioners – the basic systems are the same. These general instructions are presented for educational purposes only. This description refers to Freon (R-12) but your system may utilize other refrigerants, such as R-22 (many air conditioners) or R134 (more environmentally safe Freon replacement). Keep in mind that sections 608 and 609 of the EPA Clean Air Act prohibit venting of any CFCs to the atmosphere.
    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    Refrigeration pumps (compressors) are the simple but mysterious black canister heard vibrating behind the bottom back service panel of your refrigerator. Inside the black canister is an electric motor driving a small rotary piston pump. The pump and motor are suspended on springs (to reduce noise) in a pool of refrigerator oil inside the canister. Freon gas enters the interior canister space through a large low pressure copper tube from the evaporator.
    Refrigerator Repair in MD
    The pump inside the canister compresses the Freon gas and sends it through a smaller high pressure copper tube to cool and liquefy in the condensor heat exchanger coils. The liquid Freon is sent to a strainer/dehydrator/tank (drier) where it is filtered and passed over beads of a drying agent to remove any water. Finally, the liquid Freon is released into the evaporator, by a thermostatically controlled expansion valve, to cool the refrigeration compartment as needed.

    Refrigerator Repair in MD

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